MY SISTER’S KEEPER

on

2009

DIRECTOR: Nick Cassavetes

NOT A PART OF OUR COLLECTION

May Contain Spoilers!

Will we be adding this to our collection?  NO

This weepy, directed by Nick Cassavetes, best known by myself as Dietrich Hassler from John Woo’s, Face/Off, is a what it looks like. A sentimental tale of a dying teenager and the all the emotions there on with. But this has an added twist which does manage to propel it from the doldrums of daytime TV.

The younger sister of the terminal girl is a ‘designer baby’, bred mainly for the purpose of being a donor for her elder sister who has being diagnosed with Leukaemia . The younger girl, played by Little Miss Sunshine’sAbigail Breslin finds Alec Baldwin’s lawyer, who seems to have just stumbled off the set of 50 Rock, and proceeds to sue her parents for the rights to her own body, the rights,  she argues have been abused by her mother in her relentless quest to save her elder daughter.

The ideas raised here are intriguing, as the idea of ‘designer babies’ is always a controversial one, but creating the perfect child to be harvested for her parts, for another is even more so, but it does raise some very interesting moral issues.

But in the end, the final act ruined the drama, as everything that we have been watching just falls apart, creating a cop-out happy ending of sorts, though still leaving people sobbing enough tears to fill a bucket! But in the end, the moral questions are raised but not answered whilst solving the films core issues without harming anybody, any more than necessary.

So overall, for most of the film I was interested and at times hooked, but by the end, I felt cheated. The direction on the whole though, was never meant to be gritty or hard, in fact quite the opposite, as soft focus and slow-motion was used ad nauseam for the greatest sentimental effect. It worked, though it was a bit too much, as it seemed that we could hardly go more than five minutes with a song or a silent moment of reflection as life goes on around.

Not bad, worth a watch for the opening three acts and it does raise some valid issues but fails to commit to a view-point and lets everyone off way too easily.

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