nEoFILM ~ EPISODE 6 “CALIGULA”

February 9, 2016

The sixth episode is out of the can!

The sixth instalment of our pilot series of video reviews is up and ready to view at your leisure NOW on YouTube or through nEoFILM right here!

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In this episode, which has been brought forward for those expecting Episode 4 this week, is a review of Caligula (1979). It is EXPLICIT as is the film. This is also our first Video to use  a voice synthesiser.

So recap on what we have already stated:

We are making the move into new and uncharted territory. After six years and over 700 written reviews, we are now planning to begin recording and releasing short videos, featuring reviews, lists, rants and comments, simply extending the range of nEoFILM to a new platform.

902201_348765028577195_928092761_o-001Please be patient…

This is new ground for us and as with this very blog, it takes a while to settle down into a format and style which works for everyone, so the initial plan is for SIX episodes, each focusing on a different aspect of film and the news, muse and movie reviews concept which drives nEoFILM.

All going well the first episode should be up on tomorrow so give us a click as your support is always appreciated, as it has been for the past six years since nEoFILM’s inception in November 2009.

Thanks in advance and we hope you enjoy the show, though bare in mind, its look, tone and content will evolve as time rolls on and feedback will always be helpful.
We hope you enjoy the show…


CALIGULA

February 8, 2016

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ORIGINAL UNCUT VERSION

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CANDLES 5

DIRECTORS: Tinto Brass (Principle) & Bob Guccione & Glo Luiiancar (Additional Footage)

May contain spoilers!

I was left literally speechless after watching this. What is it? Is it a porn film? Is it a period drama? Is it an art house extravaganza? Well, for certain, it is the one of the most obscene movies that I have ever seen and I would not consider myself to be a prude.

But this film goes out of it’s way to either offend the pants off you or act as a perverse show reel for Penthouse, featuring every sexual act imaginable, whether it be sensual or depraved. Women urinating on corpses, castrations, rape, fisting, orgies, not to mention something featuring a swing and a dead fish!

This is an experience and one which will probably never leave you. It is just wall to wall sex for two and a half hours masquerading as an art house drama. It was at the point where Caligula (Malcolm McDowell) is being comforted by his wife (Helen Mirren) and sister Drusilla (Teresa Ann Savoy) in the form of a threesome, like you do, in which two of his female servants decide after watching the three of them through a spy hole, to have a bit themselves. This lesbian sex scene was the most conventional encounter of the whole film, feeling like it could have been lifted straight out of the pages of Penthouse Magazine itself and it was so out of place, I wondered if this was a sort of intermission!

maxresdefault (1)But whilst the depravity stains the film, it is not all “bad”. The staging is epic and this is no doubt, one of the the grandest and most epic pornos that I and you will ever see, with some pretty good, wide angled and naturalistic cinematography, supported by great set and costume designs and considering, some pretty decent performances from the cast, which also boasts Peter O’Toole as Tiberius and (Sir) John Gielgud) as Nerva.

If toned down by about 5000%, this would have made an average Roman film, but considering that out of the 156 minute running time, I would say that only 30 minutes would constitute an actual story and out of that, only about 10 minutes was remotely historical accurate, the technical successes of the film were squandered on what is essentially a depraved, censorship challenging porno, more interested in making headlines than telling a real story, sex or no sex.

mirren-caligula_2822175kBut the amount of sex which permeated through the ancient city of Rome, at least as portrayed in this film, was so pronounced that it actually managed to make Caligula, a man universally accepted and as a raving lunatic, a vile one at that, comes across as sympathetic, seeming to fit in to a world swollen with deprivation.

In conclusion, Caligula is a film which courts controversy, coming at the height of the X-rating era, where X-rated films where intended to be mature in tone, but became perverted into pornography which essentially high-jacked the rating. But I love films like this as they are an endless topic for debate but is this any good?

No.

It could have been so much better if it had held back a bit. There is plenty of room for sex and violence as so many period movies have proven in the four decades since Caligula’s release but at it’s heart, this had all the potential to be a memorable epic in it’s own right. Instead, it has become a sex film and that is actually a bit unfair.


HUBBLE 3D (IMAX)

February 5, 2016

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CANDLES 9

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DIRECTOR: Toni Myers

May contain spoilers!

Directed by Toni Myers, who has been involved with the production of IMAX shorts since day one, dating back to 1971, the year after the process was first rolled out, There is no doubt that we are in safe and experienced hands by the time we travel to repair Hubble.

Within seconds, the screen erupts with the IMAX logo, blasting on to the screen complete with it’s 12,000 watts of sound and crystal picture. This is going to be an IMAX experience, that is for sure. And it does not disappoint!

But first for a confession. I did NOT watch this at my local IMAX theatre, instead I watched this on my home theatre, projector and in 3D and the results were breathtaking, leaving me to wonder who much better this would have been on the towering screen. This was without a doubt one of, if not possibly the best 3D experience to date, blending a subtle effect with the profoundly dimensionalised images of deep space as captured by the Hubble Space Telescope.

The Documentary itself is fine, like most IMAX films, a coffee table book or a Sunday supplement of a documentary, showing rather than telling with glossy full page images of the Earth and the spacecraft which service Hubble, before taking us on a n awe-inspiring journey into deep space.

Leonardo DeCarprio’s narration can seem a little trite at times but it is not bad, but for the 44 minute runtime is generally used to the effect with a demonstration of what it takes or took to service the telescope as well as some insight into why it is so important. Though you can take their explanations with a pinch of salt as this is still a pro-NASA propaganda movie at its heart as so many IMAX film are, being effectively produced by NASA.

But the sentiment is true, the nature of exploration is is explored here and the message is received loud and clear. If you are looking for an audio visual extravaganza which might teach you something, then you can not go wrong with Hubble 3D.

Aspect Ratio

Imax_format_35mm_70mmOn a technical note though, I am still peeved by the fact that IMAX Blu-ray’s are all formatted in 1.78:1 in order to fill the widescreen TV, yet IMAX’s native ratio is 1.44:1, near as damn it to 1.33:1, or 4:3. The original IMAX DVD’s are in 1.33:1 which is near enough accurate yet the Blu-ray’s have been cropped. This is the equivalent of the now derided Pan and Scan format and is just plain wrong.

True that IMAX theatres are no longer limited to the 1.44:1 ratio with the so called “IMAX Experience” meaning that cinemas can just bang up a larger 1.85:1 screen and call it IMAX but still, that is another argument but to me, as fantastic as this looked in widescreen, I would have preferred to have seen this in ALL of its glory.

If you do not respect the format, leave it alone.


BLUE PLANET (IMAX)

February 4, 2016

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CANDLES 8

DIRECTOR: Ben Burtt

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May contain spoilers!

Directed by Ben Burtt, possibly one of the best sound designers to date, and certainly a great influence on a generation of movie-goers with his revolutionary work with Lucasfilm, Steven Spielberg and Pixar, just to name a few, the sounds of the Star Wars Saga are all down to this man.

So here he is, directing Blue Planet, this gorgeous IMAX documentary focusing on, you guessed it, the Planet Earth.

Beginning with the ubiquitous talk about the Earth’s oceans and their effects on continents and eco-structures of the world, it digresses into more detailed portraits of specific places where water has played a big role in their development.

The photography is beautiful, sharp and as clear as the tropical oceans of which the film catalogues, as well as utilising a bold and brisk soundtrack. Whilst IMAX documentaries are short education films, they are the most cinematic, with huge clear hi-resolution images and a loud but hi-fidelity sound system, they make full use of their theatre’s audio visual capabilities, presenting their subjects, which in this case is Planet Earth, with the grandeur which it deserves but rarely receives in motion pictures.

But being the format that it is, it is allowed the space and time to revel in this grandeur, scope and scale, whilst educating us on the issues relating the subject, with this now serving a time capsule on the views surrounding global warming back in 1990.

Blue Planet, like most IMAX documentaries, will be an acquired taste. Documentary fans will probably complain that they are too short and not informative enough whilst many movie fans would probably leave these in the grand scale of the IMAX cinema but as for me, these IMAX documentaries are the blockbusters of the genre, revelling in the spectacle of cinema whilst having the benefit of a little education thrown in for good measure.

But how do these massive screen experiences translate to the small screen? Well for a start it depends who big your small screen is? I preferred the DVD copy of this film, as it was shot and presented in an aspect ratio of 1.44:1, which is most closely replicated in 1.33:1 here on the DVD, but the Blu-ray has reformatted it into 1.78:1 widescreen, which I presume would have cropped the images somewhat.

But whilst Blu-ray would most accurately represent the clarity of IMAX, the DVD will provide us with more scale and as a purist, the DVD wins out. But how can these films possibly be shown on a small screen? Easily. How is any movie shown on a small screen? If they are well shot, size is irrelevant.


ATTILA THE HUN AND THE EXPLODING PROJECTOR

February 3, 2016

attila-aka-attila-il-flagello-di-dio-everett

Starring Anthony Qvinn (better known by actual name, Quinn) and Sofia Loren, Attila (aka Attila, Il Flagello Di Dio) is a 1954 spaghetti epic, a term used to describe Italian sword and sandal films of the era, following the fall of The Roman Empire to the Huns, namely Attila (Quinn).

But this film, spoken in Italian, is not available in English at all on DVD, not even subtitled but I believe that a VHS exists. We have a Super 8(mm) print, (entitled Attila The Hun) struck by the now defunct A.V. supplier Derran Audio Visual, complete with an English dub. So this print is very rare and one of the few ways that this film can be seen in English.

But besides watching this over 20 years ago, I cannot remember too much of this. So we have tried to watch this again, only to be met a obstacles. The first being the bulb blowing, which is not unusual, but after a replacement arrived, we tried again. Finally making it to the second reel, the projector exploded!

A loud bang and a plume of smoke pretty much put paid to any plans to watch this doomed movie. Is it a sign? Well, we are defiantly making sure that a fire extinguisher is to hand next time but sign or no sign, we are persevering with this film and a review WILL be written if we have to go through ten projectors!

But a new one is on the way and we will be trying this again sooner rather than later…


nEoFILM ~ EPISODE 3 “THE RAZZIES”

February 2, 2016

The third episode is out of the can!

The third instalment of our pilot series of video reviews is up and ready to view at your leisure NOW on YouTube or through nEoFILM right here!

This episode focuses on our reaction to the 2016 “Razzies”.

So recap on what we have already stated:

We are making the move into new and uncharted territory. After six years and over 700 written reviews, we are now planning to begin recording and releasing short videos, featuring reviews, lists, rants and comments, simply extending the range of nEoFILM to a new platform.

Please be patient…

902201_348765028577195_928092761_o-001This is new ground for us and as with this very blog, it takes a while to settle down into a format and style which works for everyone, so the initial plan is for SIX episodes, each focusing on a different aspect of film and the news, muse and movie reviews concept which drives nEoFILM.

All going well the first episode should be up on tomorrow so give us a click as your support is always appreciated, as it has been for the past six years since nEoFILM’s inception in November 2009.

Thanks in advance and we hope you enjoy the show, though bare in mind, its look, tone and content will evolve as time rolls on and feedback will always be helpful.

We hope you enjoy the show…


FILM OF THE MONTH ~ JANUARY 2016

February 1, 2016

Welcome to 2016! This month has seen no 10 Candle films so far, but there was a “Stinker” …

So, the Film Of The Month for January 2016 is…

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CANDLES 9

The TOP FIVE are…

  1. FAHRENHEIT 9/11 (2004) 9/10
  2. HIGH NOON (1952) 9/10
  3. NOAH (3D) (2013) 8/10
  4. HOLIDAY IN SPAIN (SCENT OF MYSTERY) (CINERAMA) (1962) 8/10
  5. RUN WILD, RUN FREE (16mm) (1969) 7/10

 

… and this month’s STINKER is…

BBFC-xlarge(The “Stinker” is a 1 Candle film for this month. The lowest rated movie was…)

  • PAINT DRYING (2016) 1/10


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